In Andrew Weaver a Politician is Born

An interesting thing happened during British Columbia’s 41st general election– a distinguished professor turned Green Party leader became a politician. Once pushed from the womb of academia and into the wild and wacky world of British Columbia politics, it did not take Andrew Weaver very long to get on his feet and undermine the government and the established parliamentary system while holding a meagre three seats in the legislature. This one is going to grow to be big and strong no doubt.

Let me be clear; I am not for one moment suggesting that a coalition, or as they call it, a supported-government, is undemocratic or unparliamentary. Quite the opposite, I would indeed be among the first to stand here and explain the intricacies and realities of our parliamentary system which permits such occurrences. And I believe in the parliamentary system and one that is sustained with a first past the post electoral system with ridings distrusted across the state according to relative population. And this is how we ended up with a result where the incumbent BC Liberals hold 43 seats (one seat shy of a majority sustainment), the BC NDP holds 41 and the BC Greens hold 3 (together enough to maintain the confidence of the legislature, if they worked together).

But besides permitting the BC NDP and BC Greens to work together in the legislature to form government and sustain confidence in the legislature, the parliamentary system has a host of other conventions that inform conduct in periods such as these. For example, the incumbency convention holds that no matter the results, the government in power gets first crack in the legislature to form government. This is why you see when a Prime Minister or Premier fail to garner a plurality of seats in the legislature they publicly resign from their office.  Otherwise, the GG or LG is compelled through the incumbency convention to allow the previous head of government first crack at getting confidence in the legislature. This is also why Premier Christy Clark is still the head of the BC government– and subsequently has the ability to deliver a Throne Speech regardless of the agreement came upon by the BC NDP and BC Greens.

When the results from the 41st general election in BC came down (and they took awhile to settle out and come down officially), it was clear that the BC Liberal Party did not have a majority of seats in the legislature, and thus would not be able to sustain their majority government. But they did have a plurality and because of the incumbency convention, they remained in power and Clark was invited to continue her ministry. Andrew Weaver proved his political stripes by undermining the incumbency convention and publicly siding with the BC NDP for four years. Without even hearing officially from the government via a Throne Speech in the legislature, Weaver and two of the Green Party MLAs decided that there was absolutely nothing the government could offer to gain their support. Andrew Weaver is now playing a political game, and very dangerous one at that. Tying himself to the NDP could surely prove to undermine an honest effort by the BC Greens to pitch themselves as not too extreme to form government, or in this case, at least hold the balance of power.

But what of backroom deals and talks? Dispense with them! They are not parliament and any idea that “ratifying” them by each caucus someone seals the deal is false, pure and simple. Those are not binding on the state, and rightfully so; parliament is the official forum of the electors. We saw that when Harper, Layton and Duceppe signed an agreement when they tried to undermine the Martin ministry– it meant nothing without parliamentary action to take down the government. And furthermore when Dion, Layton and Duceppe attempted to undermine the Harper ministry– it certainly did not withhold the authority of the PM to prorogue parliament to avoid actually sealing the deal. The NDP at least have the cover of their role as the Official Opposition to claim a reason to oppose the government at all turns– I concede that opposition is just as important as government in a parliamentary system. But the BC Greens ought to have sustained the Clark government, at least to the Throne Speech in order to sustain the incumbency convention and demonstrate their respect for parliament.

A true politician was born during this election. It will be interesting to see him fumble through his teenage years with his seemingly new best friend in John Horgan.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gorbould/4229750461/

Announcement: 2017 Site Changes

I’ve been working on a few cosmetic changes with the site that is going to affect postings as well. For example, the weekly Status of Government Business update post will no longer be in post format. It will be a page which can be accessed through the menu above under the Parliament of Canada heading. It will be updated weekly on Sunday evenings and the week prior and following any recess or resumption of business. I will be going through the old Status of Government Business posts and removing them to clean up a bit so you can expect to not see them anymore as well as the tags relevant to those posts (i.e. the bills) will be removed as well.

You may have also already noticed a new logo for the site. This is just part of the rebranding campaign following the acquisition of the Parliament.Blog domain from WordPress. Let me know what you think of the changes.

Liberals Cash-for-Access

I am inclined to agree with the recent assessment made by Rex Murphy in an attempt to explain the bizarre messaging from the Liberal government on the political financing issue. This Liberal government, and indeed everyone before it, possesses an air of arrogance that compels them to conclude that everything they do in inherent right and good, and therefore how dare we question them. It was the same attitude that brought down only the most recent Liberal government before Justin Trudeau, and it is one that seems to be sticking pretty hard to the Liberals at the moment.

The reason why I am so confident that the Liberals believe they possess this miraculous capability for political decision making is because it seems to be the only logical and reasonable explanation as to why the Liberal government insists on sputtering out worn talking point after worn talking point on the issue. Reminding any Canadian willing to listen that the federal government in Canada has some of the most rigorous laws concerning political financing in the world. Never mind the fact that the original question was the Prime Minister’s actions against his own words in the letters he drafted for each of his ministers. Even this morning we see a weak argument from the government about being ready to co-operate with the Ethics Commissioner and something, something laws being the strongest.

Rex Murphy on the Liberals' 'side-splitting defence' of its political fundraising tactics.
Rex Murphy on the Liberals’ ‘side-splitting defence’ of its political fundraising tactics.

Here is the part that Murphy gets and I am in full agreement. Something smells here. It is hard to accept that government business is not discussed at these meetings. It is even harder to accept that what business is discussed is strictly linked to the middle class. It is tough to square offers of invitations to tax payer funded state dinners against political influence and the obvious access to power it assumes. Canadians should rightly become concerned if not slightly angered. But the response from the open and sunny way government under Justin Trudeau is not to explain clearly what is happening but to shut the door and avoid the questions entirely. The bag may smell, but it has a Liberal party logo on the side, so we’re meant to carry on and accept that what is happening is meant to be a good, it is going to be right for the country.

The problem, is that history paints a different picture. Never mind with just Liberal governments, all governments are indeed subject to the temptation of corruptibility. It is why we have laws in the first place. Canadians expect this. It is also why Justin Trudeau was able to score support with the language he used in his letters. Canadians expected even more than just the law– regardless of how strong in it relative to other countries or even provinces– and the Liberal government in the end has failed to deliver.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gorbould/4229750461/

Announcement: New Site Branding

In light of the recent WordPress release of .blog domains, this site will be rebranded slightly as the result of securing the Parliament.blog domain. This means that the header and all references to Crown, Rod and Mace will soon be replaced with Parliament.Blog. We will still be offering the same insight into the law, traditions and customs of the Parliament of Canada as well as our weekly tracking of Government Legislation and occasional editorials. If you have CrownRodandMace.com bookmarked, or you are one of those forgetful people who will still access the site via CrownRodandMace.com, do not worry, that URL will redirect to the new site without issue at least for the next six months.